Cybersecurity is the C-suite’s job too, suggesting responsibility for risk starts at the top and involves everyone. AT&T’s Internet of Things organization works to understand the difference between IT and IoT. Use a multilayer strategy to get data off devices to the cloud. There are 16 distinct types of meetings—each of which is designed to achieve a specific goal.

1 Cybersecurity in the C-Suite
Peggy Smedley says too many businesses are undergoing an IoT (Internet of Things) transformation lack a cybersecurity understanding. She says cybersecurity is the c-suite’s job too, suggesting responsibility for risk starts at the top and involves everyone. She encourages c-suite executives to engage themselves in cybersecurity and the company’s digital transformation. She also looks at cyber insurance—and addresses if it provides a dangerous sense of security. She says we can predict so we don’t have to react.
http://peggysmedleyshow.com
2 A Strategy for Cybersecurity
Peggy chat with Senthil Ramakrishnan, lead member of technical staff in AT&T’s Internet of Things organization, who says one of the first steps with cybersecurity is understanding what IoT is—and it starts at the c-level. The primary mistake companies make is they deploy IoT without understanding the difference between IT and IoT. Often, they don’t include the new cybersecurity challenges that the IoT brings. The second challenge is devices will have a very long lifecycle. He explains that it all starts with education. Today some industrial control systems are still running legacy systems, but a company can use a multilayer strategy to get data off devices to the cloud, he says. Once a company has a multilayer strategy, it can then manage its risk.
https://www.att.com
3 Making Meetings More Effective
Peggy and Elise Keith, cofounder, Lucid Meetings, and author of Where the Action Is: The Meetings that Make or Break Your Organization, discuss meetings. Keith says every aspect of our world is moving faster, and thus we need to bring the people together. For many, meetings are just something that people do—it is not something leaders get training in. She suggests that is not always safe. Some organizations are very intentional and design systems that are very clear about how they make decisions and other techniques. She says there are 16 distinct types of meetings—each of which is designed to achieve a specific goal. Often, problems are caused because people aren’t clear on what they are trying to achieve. Three major categories of meetings include: monitoring and moving forward the work we are already doing; create new ideas and solve problems; and partnerships and the art of the deal.
https://www.lucidmeetings.com/book